Ohio Statewide Independent Living Council Logo

State: Ohio

Agency: Ohio Rehabilitation Services Commission

Plan for: 2011-2013

Submitted in fiscal year: 2010

Table of Contents

Part I: Assurances

 

Section 1: Legal Basis and Certifications

Section 2: SPIL Development

Section 3: Independent Living Services

Section 4: Eligibility

Section 5: Staffing Requirements

Section 6: Fiscal Control and Fund Accounting

Section 7: Recordkeeping, Access and Reporting

Section 8: Protection, Use and Release of Personal Information

Section 9: Signatures

Part II: Narrative

Section 1: Goals, Objectives and Activities

Section 2: Scope, Extent, and Arrangements of Services

Section 3: Design for the Statewide Network of Centers

Section 4: Designated State Unit (DSU)

Section 5: Statewide Independent Living Council (SILC)

Section 6: Service Provider Requirements

Section 7: Evaluation

Section 8: State-Imposed Requirements

State Plan for Independent Living (SPIL)

State: Ohio

Agency: Ohio Rehabilitation Services Commission

Plan for: 2011-2013

Submitted in fiscal year: 2010

Part I: Assurances

Section 1: Legal Basis and Certifications

1.1 The designated State unit (DSU) eligible to submit the State Plan for Independent Living (SPIL or the plan) and authorized under State law to perform the functions of the State under the State Independent Living Services (SILS) and Centers for Independent Living (CIL) programs.

Ohio Rehabilitation Services Commission

1.2 The separate State agency eligible to submit the plan and authorized under State law to provide vocational rehabilitation (VR) services to individuals who are blind.

N/A

1.3 The Statewide Independent Living Council (SILC) that meets the requirements of section 705 of the Act and is authorized to perform the functions outlined in section 705(c) of the Act in the State.

Ohio Statewide Independent Living Council

1.4 The DSU and, if applicable, the separate State agency authorized to provide VR services to individuals who are blind, and the SILC are authorized to jointly develop, sign and submit this SPIL on behalf of the State, and have adopted or otherwise formally approved the SPIL.

Yes

1.5 The DSU, and, if applicable, the separate State agency authorized to provide VR services to individuals who are blind, may legally carry out each provision of the plan and will comply with all applicable Federal statutes and regulations in effect with respect to the three-year period it receives funding under the SPIL.

Yes

1.6 The SPIL is the basis for State operation and administration of the program. All provisions of the SPIL are consistent with State law.

Yes

1.7 The representative of the DSU and, if applicable, of the separate State agency authorized to provide VR services to individuals who are blind, who has the authority under State law to receive, hold, and disburse Federal funds made available under the SPIL and to submit the SPIL jointly with the SILC chairperson is Michael Rench, ORSC Administrator and N/A.

Section 2: SPIL Development

2.1 The plan shall be reviewed and revised not less than once every three years, to ensure the existence of appropriate planning, financial support and coordination, and other assistance to appropriately address, on a statewide and comprehensive basis, the needs in the State for:

  • The provision of State independent living services;
  • The development and support of a statewide network of centers for independent living;
  • Working relationships between programs providing independent living services and independent living centers, the vocational rehabilitation program established under title I, and other programs providing services for individuals with disabilities.

Yes

2.2 The DSU and SILC conduct public meetings to provide all segments of the public, including interested groups, organizations and individuals, an opportunity to comment on the State plan prior to its submission to the Commissioner and on any revisions to the approved State plan.

Yes

2.3 The DSU and SILC establish and maintain a written description of procedures for conducting public meetings in accordance with the following requirements. The DSU and SILC shall provide:

  • appropriate and sufficient notice of the public meetings;
  • reasonable accommodation to individuals with disabilities who rely on alternative modes of communication in the conduct of the public meetings, including providing sign language interpreters and audio-loops; and
  • public meeting notices, written material provided prior to or at the public meetings, and the approved State plan in accessible formats for individuals who rely on alternative modes of communication.

Yes

2.4 At the public meetings to develop the State plan, the DSU and SILC identify those provisions in the SPIL that are State-imposed requirements beyond what would be required to comply with the regulations in 34 CFR parts 364, 365, 366, and 367.

Yes

2.5 The DSU will seek to incorporate into, and describe in, the State plan any new methods or approaches for the provision of IL services to older individuals who are blind that are developed under a project funded under chapter 2 of title VII of the Act and that the DSU determines to be effective.

Yes

2.6 The DSU and SILC actively consult, as appropriate, in the development of the State plan with the director of the Client Assistance Program (CAP) authorized under section 112 of the Act.

Yes

Section 3: Eligibility

3.1 The State, directly or through grants or contracts, will provide IL services with Federal, State, or other funds

Yes

3.2 Independent living services shall be provided to individuals with significant disabilities in accordance with an independent living plan mutually agreed upon by an appropriate staff member of the service provider and the individual, unless the individual signs a waiver stating that such a plan is unnecessary.

Yes

3.3 All service providers will use formats that are accessible to notify individuals seeking or receiving IL services under chapter 1 of title VII about:

  • the availability of the CAP authorized by section 112 of the Act;
  • the purposes of the services provided under the CAP; and
  • how to contact the CAP.

Yes

3.4 Participating service providers meet all applicable State licensure or certification requirements.

Yes

Section 4: Eligibility

4.1 Any individual with a significant disability, as defined in 34 CFR 364.4(b), is eligible for IL services under the SILS and CIL programs authorized under chapter 1 of title VII of the Act. Any individual may seek information about IL services under these programs and request referral to other services and programs for individuals with significant disabilities, as appropriate. The determination of an individual's eligibility for IL services under the SILS and CIL programs meets the requirements of 34 CFR 364.51.

Yes

4.2 Service providers apply eligibility requirements without regard to age, color, creed, gender, national origin, race, religion or type of significant disability of the individual applying for IL services.

Yes

4.3 Service providers do not impose any State or local residence requirement that excludes any individual who is present in the State and who is otherwise eligible for IL services from receiving IL services.

Yes

Section 5: Staffing Requirements

5.1 Service provider staff includes personnel who are specialists in the development and provision of IL services and in the development and support of centers.

Yes

5.2 To the maximum extent feasible, a service provider makes available personnel able to communicate:

  • with individuals with significant disabilities who rely on alternative modes of communication, such as manual communication, nonverbal communication, nonverbal communication devices, Braille or audio tapes, and who apply for or receive IL services under title VII of the Act; and
  • in the native languages of individuals with significant disabilities whose English proficiency is limited and who apply for or receive IL services under title VII of the Act.

Yes

5.3 Service providers establish and maintain a program of staff development for all classes of positions involved in providing IL services and, if appropriate, in administering the CIL program. The staff development programs emphasize improving the skills of staff directly responsible for the provision of IL services, including knowledge of and practice in the IL philosophy.

Yes

5.4 All recipients of financial assistance under parts B and C of chapter 1 of title VII of the Act will take affirmative action to employ and advance in employment qualified individuals with significant disabilities on the same terms and conditions required with respect to the employment of individuals with disabilities under section 503 of the Act.

Yes

Section 6: Fiscal Control and Fund Accounting

6.1 All recipients of financial assistance under parts B and C of chapter 1 of title VII of the Act will comply with applicable EDGAR fiscal and accounting requirements and will adopt those fiscal control and fund accounting procedures as may be necessary to ensure the proper disbursement of and accounting for those funds.

Yes

Section 7: Recordkeeping, Access and Reporting

7.1 In addition to complying with applicable EDGAR recordkeeping requirements, all recipients of financial assistance under parts B and C of chapter 1 of title VII of the Act will maintain records that fully disclose and document:

  • the amount and disposition by the recipient of that financial assistance;
  • The total cost of the project or undertaking in connection with which the financial assistance is given or used;
  • the amount of that portion of the cost of the project or undertaking supplied by other sources;
  • compliance with the requirements of chapter 1 of title VII of the Act and Part 364 of the regulations; and
  • other information that the Commissioner determines to be appropriate to facilitate an effective audit.

Yes

7.2 With respect to the records that are required by 34 CFR 364.35, all recipients of financial assistance under parts B and C of chapter 1 of title VII of the Act will submit reports that the Commissioner determines to be appropriate.

Yes

7.3 All recipients of financial assistance under parts B and C of chapter 1 of title VII of the Act will provide access to the Commissioner and the Comptroller General, or any of their duly authorized representatives, to the records listed in 34 CFR 364.37 for the purpose of conducting audits, examinations, and compliance reviews.

Yes

Section 8: Protection, Use, and Release of Personal Information

8.1 Each service provider will adopt and implement policies and procedures to safeguard the confidentiality of all personal information, including photographs and lists of names in accordance with the requirements of 34 CFR 364.56(a)(1-6).

Yes

Section 9: Signatures

After having carefully reviewed all of the assurances in sections 1 - 8 of this SPIL, the undersigned hereby affirm that the State of Ohio is in compliance and will remain in compliance with the aforementioned assurances during 2011-2013.

The effective date of this SPIL is October 1, 2010.

Section 9: Signature for SILC Chairperson

Name

Michael Corbett

Title

OSILC Chairperson

Signed?

No

Date signed

Section 9: Signature for DSU Director

Name

Michael Rench

Title

ORSC Administrator

Signed?

No

Date signed

Section 9: Signature for Separate State Agency for Individuals Who Are Blind

Is there a Separate State Agency for Individuals Who Are Blind?

No

Name

N/A

Title

N/A

Signed?

No

Date signed

State Plan for Independent Living (SPIL)

State:

Ohio

Agency:

Ohio Rehabilitation Services Commission

Plan for:

2011-2013

Submitted in fiscal year:

2010

Part II: Narrative

Section 1: Goals, Objectives and Activities - Screen 1

1.1 Goals and Mission

Describe the overall goals and mission of the State's IL programs and services. The SPIL must address the goals and mission of both the SILS and the CIL programs, including those of the State agency for individuals who are blind as they relate to the parts of the SPIL administered by that agency.

Goal Name:

Goal #1

Goal Description:

A strong, statewide network of independent living services and supports, promoting choice and community based living opportunities for people with disabilities.

Goal Name:

Goal #2

Goal Description:

The statewide network of independent living services and supports receives sufficient funding to sustain and expand the capacity of current CILs, and to add CILs as needed to address the needs of unserved areas of the state.

Goal Name:

Goal #3

Goal Description:

The state of Ohio is free of access barriers.

Goal Name:

Goal #4

Goal Description:

People with disabilities together increased the awareness and understanding of public policymakers, IL constituents, and the general public on issues related to national and state disability policy.

Goal Name:

Goal #5

Goal Description:

People with disabilities have opportunities to develop assets, improve economic stability, and build healthy financial futures.

Goal Name:

Goal Description:

Goal Name:

Goal Description:

Goal Name:

Goal Description:

State Plan for Independent Living (SPIL)

State:

Ohio

Agency:

Ohio Rehabilitation Services Commission

Plan for:

2011-2013

Submitted in fiscal year:

2010

Part II: Narrative

Section 1: Goals, Objectives and Activities - Screen 2

1.2 Objectives

1.2A. Specify the objectives to be achieved and the time frame for achieving them.

Goal(s) from Section 1.1

Objective to be achieved

Time frame start date

Time frame end date

Goal #1

SILC in collaboration with the CIL Association will develop a common IL identity by 2013 so people with disabilities know who to contact for IL services.

10/01/2010

09/30/2013

Goal #1

Provision of direct IL services through the CILs will increase by 3% in the identified underserved populations to be served with ARRA funds over Year 1 of the SPIL.

10/01/2010

09/30/2011

Goal #1

Through coordination of services such as HOME Choice and Access Success the CILs will collectively assist 100 persons to relocate from nursing facilities over the next three years.

10/01/2010

09/30/2013

Goal #1

SILC/CILs will have collaborated with other agencies to provide individuals with disabilities with relevant assistive technology information through at least four diverse venues.

10/01/2010

09/30/2013

Goal #1

SILC will facilitate and strengthen partnerships with other disability agencies by inviting liaisons to attend and report updates at bimonthly SILC meetings.

10/01/2010

09/30/2013

Goal #1

By 2012 SILC/DSU/CILs will develop an Ohio Independent Living Network Community Living Data Interchange System which will increase capacity as information will be easier to retrieve.

10/01/2010

09/30/2012

Goal #2

SILC/DSU/CILs will increase GRF funding to pursue IL coverage and build capacity for underserved populations and unserved areas of the state.

10/01/2010

09/30/2013

Goal #2

Twice per year SILC and DSU in partnership with the CIL Association will collaborate to identify additional sources of funding.

10/01/2010

09/30/2013

Goal #3

Annually, the SILC and CILs will assist 500 new persons with disabilities to receive information on their civil rights and the process to challenge aspects of exclusion.

10/01/2010

09/30/2013

Goal #3

CILs and SILC will expand accessible transportation options by participating in state, local, county and regional transportation related committees and groups for their service areas.

10/01/2010

09/30/2013

Goal #3

By 2013 the CILs and SILC will have worked with such agencies as local housing authorities; Ohio Department of Development-Ohio Housing Finance Agency; and the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development to increase the housing stock of affordable, accessible, and safe housing for individuals with disabilities.

10/01/2010

09/30/2013

Goal #3

SILC and CILs insure emergency planning authorities include measures for people with disabilities.

10/01/2010

09/30/2013

Goal #4

In the 2012 Presidential Election Ohio voters with disabilities will surpass their past 57.6% voter turn out.

10/01/2010

12/30/2012

Goal #4

Annually, SILC/DSU/CILs collectively will faciliate at least four opportunities to increase the number and skills of new leaders with disabilities from youth and minority populations.

10/01/2010

09/30/2013

 

 

 

 

Goal #4

SILC/DSU/CILs will facilitate the participation of people with disabilities at disability related hearings that pertain to issues such as budget, housing, and transportation by increasing awareness of such hearings.

10/01/2010

09/30/2013

Goal #4

SILC will establish by 2013 a special Citizen's Committee led by an exofficio SILC member for the purpose of educating state legislators to the IL philosophy and pending legislative initiatives.

10/01/2010

09/30/2013

Goal #5

SILC/DSU/CILs will increase awareness of people with disabilities of Medicaid Buy In for Workers with Disabilities.

10/01/2010

09/30/2013

Goal #5

CILs/SILC will educate persons with disabilities of their financial options so they can build healthy financial futures.

10/01/2010

09/30/2013

State Plan for Independent Living (SPIL)

State:

Ohio

Agency:

Ohio Rehabilitation Services Commission

Plan for:

2011-2013

Submitted in fiscal year:

2010

Part II: Narrative

Section 1: Goals, Objectives and Activities - Screen 3

1.2 Objectives

1.2B Describe the steps planned regarding outreach to populations in the State that are unserved or underserved by programs under title VII, including minority groups and urban and rural populations.

  • Identify the populations to be designated for targeted outreach efforts

Each of the CILs have identified their particular underserved populations in their service areas. The primary groups targeted for outreach efforts include people in long term care facilities wishing to relocate into the community transition age youth and Hispanics. Other specific populations identified by individual CILs include Appalachians African Americans and populations whose native language is not English.

  • Identify the geographic areas (i.e., communities) in which the targeted populations reside

Again each CIL has identified underserved geographic areas in which underserved populations may reside or due to the location itself is underserved. The following list specifically identifies targeted geographic areas and/or populations within those geographic areas: Greene Clark and Preble counties; The rural counties of Adams Brown and Highland and to a lesser degree Clermont and Warren counties; Hispanic population in Butler and Hamilton counties; Hispanic population in Lorain and Erie counties; Morrow and Crawford counties; Geauga County; People that have hearing and or visual impairments in Cuyahoga; Lake and Geauga Counties; Portage and Stark counties specifically the cities/townships of Ravenna Kent Edinboro and Rootstown in Portage county and Canton Alliance Jackson Township Beach City and Navarre in Stark county.

  • Describe how the needs of individuals with significant disabilities from minority group backgrounds will be addressed

The SILC and CILS all develop their own plans for outreach to minority groups, based upon the unique characteristics of their particular service areas. In general the SILC and CILs implement the following strategies for outreach to minority groups:
The use of HOME Choice and ACCESS Success programs to reach individuals in nursing homes wishing to transition to the community;
Increasing public awareness of IL services through public service announcements, newspapers and other media, particularly those directed towards specific minority populations;
Participation in local community events;
Participation in local organizations;
Collaboration with the DSU in various events and media opportunities.

1.3 Financial Plan

Describe in sections 1.3A and 1.3B, below, the financial plan for the use of Federal and non-Federal funds to meet the SPIL objectives.

1.3A Financial Plan Tables

Complete the financial plan tables covering years 1, 2 and 3 of this SPIL. For each funding source, provide estimated dollar amounts anticipated for the applicable uses. The financial plan table should include only those funding sources and amounts that are intended to support one or more of the objectives identified in section 1.2 of the SPIL. To the extent possible, the tables and narratives must reflect the applicable financial information from centers for independent living. Refer to the SPIL Instructions for additional information about completing the financial tables and narratives.

Year 1 - 2011 Approximate funding amounts and uses

Sources

SILC resource plan

IL services

General CIL operations

Other SPIL activities

Title VII Funds

$22,224

$0

$2,967,186

$0

Title VII Funds Chapter 1, Part B

$22,224

$0

$629,998

$0

Title VII Funds Chapter 1, Part C

$0

$0

$2,337,188

$0

Title VII Funds Chapter 2, OIB (only those provided by the OIB grantee to further a SPIL objective)

$0

$0

$0

$0

Other Federal funds - Sec. 101(a)(18) of the Act (Innovation and Expansion)

$250,000

$0

$0

$0

Other Federal funds - other

$182,873

$0

$1,561,964

$0

Non-Federal funds - State funds

$182,000

$0

$70,000

$0

 

$0

 

 

 

 

$0

 

 

 

 

$0

 

 

 

 

$0

 

 

 

 

$0

 

 

 

Total

659321

0

7566336

0

Year 2 - 2012 Approximate funding amounts and uses

Sources

SILC resource plan

IL services

General CIL operations

Other SPIL activities

Title VII Funds

$22,224

$0

$2,967,186

$0

Title VII Funds Chapter 1, Part B

$22,224

$0

$629,998

$0

Title VII Funds Chapter 1, Part C

$0

$0

$2,337,188

$0

Title VII Funds Chapter 2, OIB (only those provided by the OIB grantee to further a SPIL objective)

$0

$0

$0

$0

Other Federal funds - Sec. 101(a)(18) of the Act (Innovation and Expansion)

$250,000

$0

$0

$0

Other Federal funds - other

$0

$0

$0

$0

Non-Federal funds - State funds

$182,000

$0

$70,000

$0

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total

476448

0

6004372

0

Year 3 - 2013 Approximate funding amounts and uses

Sources

SILC resource plan

IL services

General CIL operations

Other SPIL activities

Title VII Funds

$22,224

$0

$2,967,186

$0

Title VII Funds Chapter 1, Part B

$22,224

$0

$629,998

$0

Title VII Funds Chapter 1, Part C

$0

$0

$2,337,188

$0

Title VII Funds Chapter 2, OIB (only those provided by the OIB grantee to further a SPIL objective)

$0

$0

$0

$0

Other Federal funds - Sec. 101(a)(18) of the Act (Innovation and Expansion)

$250,000

$0

$0

$0

Other Federal funds - other

$0

$0

$0

$0

Non-Federal funds - State funds

$182,000

$0

$70,000

$0

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total

476448

0

6004372

0

1.3B Financial Plan Narratives

1.3B(1) Specify how the part B, part C and chapter 2 (Older Blind) funds, if applicable, will further the SPIL objectives.

SPIL objectives will be furthered using part B and part C funds by providing an ongoing funding stream to SILC and CILs in order to continue to provide Independent Living services established in Ohio. The resource plan for part B and part C funds contained in this SPIL is flat funded for the 2011-2013 period.

Estimated SILC funds available for this SPIL break down into the following categories: Title VII Part B funds for each year of the SPIL $22,224; I and E funds for each year of the SPIL $250,000; Other Federal funds - other (ARRA Part B) are only available in year 1 of the SPIL $182,873; Non-federal funds - State funds for each year of the SPIL $252,000.

Estimated funds available for this SPIL for the general operations of the CILs break down into the following categories: Title VII Part B funds for each year of the SPIL $629,998; Title VII Part C funds $2,337,188 for each year of the SPIL; other Federal funds - other (ARRA Part C) are only available in year 1 of the SPIL $1,561,964; non-federal funds - State funds for each year of the SPIL $70,000.

Estimated funds for the Ohio Association of Centers for Independent Living (OACIL) will ensure the ongoing collaboration between CILs, SILC, and the DSU in the amount of $39,000 each year of the SPIL. Funding will be used to hire an assistant to the OACIL Chair.

The resource plan does not take into account any funds rasied by individual CILs at the local level from various sources.

The Ohio Independent Living Older Blind program is operated outside the Independent Living Program therefore chapter 2 funds are not referenced in this plan.

Majority of the objectives are collaborative efforts between SILC/CILs/DSU. Though the SILC receives Part B funds and most CILs receive both, the DSU receives neither. The following funds will support the following objectives as follows:

Part B funds will support the following objectives:
Statewide Network of Services objectives 1,3,4,5,6
Expand Funding and Capacity objectives 1,2
Access Removal objectives 1,2,3,4
National and State Disability Policy objectives 1,2,3,4
Economic Self-sufficiency objectives 1,2

Part C funds will support the following objectives:
Statewide Network of Services objectives 1,2,3,4,6
Expand Funding and Capacity objectives 1,2
Access Removal objectives 1,2,3,4
National and State Disability Policy 1,2,3
Economic Self-sufficiency objectives 1,2

1.3B(2) Describe efforts to coordinate Federal and State funding for centers and IL services, including the amounts, sources and purposes of the funding to be coordinated.

Subject to availability and on an annual basis the SILC writes grants for non-match GRF funds to nine of the CILs. The grant amounts are determined by the SILC board prior to announcements. Due to the GRF shortfall no non-match GRF grants are expected to be issued in FFYs 2011-2013.

1.3B(3) Describe any in-kind resources including plant, equipment or services to be provided in support of the SILC resource plan, IL services, general CIL operations and/or other SPIL objectives.

The DSU has coordinated with IL to provide bridge teleconferencing and videoconferencing capabilities for meetings and public hearings at their facility. The DSU also provides use of their website for posting meeting announcements or other information regarding IL.

1.3B(4) Provide any additional information about the financial plan, as appropriate.

The resource plan for this SPIL includes ARRA part B and part C funds for Year 1 (2011). These funds will be exhausted in 2011 and therefore are not reflected in Year 2 and Year 3 of the plan. For the first time the DSU has committed $250,000 in Innovation and Expansion (I and E) funds each year of the 2011-2013 SPIL. Expenditure of I and E funds will be for SILC operations and funding as noted above for the OACIL. Annually, SILC will provide the DSU a report on how the reserved funds were used during the preceding year.

1.4 Compatibility with Chapter 1 of Title VII and the CIL Work Plans

1.4A Describe how the SPIL objectives are consistent with and further the purpose of chapter 1 of title VII of the Act as stated in section 701 of the Act and 34 CFR 364.2.

The SPIL objectives are the key components that will allow people with disabilities to live as independently as possible in the setting of their choice. Input is gathered from public hearings, an Ohio Needs Assessment survey, and other surveys conducted by CILs in Ohio to affirm the priorities that must be addressed so fewer people are forced into institutional care due to lack of access and community based service and support options.

1.4B Describe how, in developing the SPIL objectives, the DSU and the SILC considered and incorporated, where appropriate, the priorities and objectives established by centers for independent living under section 725(c)(4) of the Act.

CIL participation is actively pursued. A CIL Executive Director was appointed as Chair to the SPIL development committee. Direct inquiry to CILs and the OACIL at the start of the SPIL process resulted in respective priorities incorporated into the SPIL process. The CIL representative is part of the SILC Executive Committee that recommends approval before it is sent to the DSU for its approval.

1.5 Cooperation, Coordination, and Working Relationships Among Various Entities

Describe the steps that will be taken to maximize the cooperation, coordination and working relationships among the SILS program, the SILC, and centers; the DSU, other State agencies represented on the SILC and other councils that address the needs of specific disability populations and issues; and other public and private entities determined to be appropriate by the SILC.
The description must identify the entities with which the DSU and the SILC will cooperate and coordinate.

The SILC seeks to maximize resources as well as cooperation with the CILs in a number of ways. The SILC provides funding for the CIL Representative, the active Ohio Association of Centers for Independent Living(OACIL), and financial assistance for staff and/or clients of CILs to attend IL related meetings or conferences. In addition the SILC provides technical assistance to CILs for management of ARRA funds reporting requirements and for the CFAL system installation and training.

The SILC coordinates with the CILs and OACIL as well as other agencies, private and public, to facilitate the goals of increased affordable accessible housing, the elimination of nursing home reimbursements in statute and the implementation of Olmstead through active participation by SILC staff with the Ohio Olmstead Task Force. In addition, SILC staff work actively with the Ohio Disability Vote Coalition to help maximize the political power of Ohioans with disabilities through nonpartisan voter education, registration and participation in the election process.

Agencies with whom the SILC coordinates: Ohio Rehabilitation Services Commission, Ohio Legal Rights Service, Ohio Emergency Management Agency, Ohio Community Service Council (state), The Brain Injury Association of Ohio, the Developmental Disabilities (DD) Council, the Department of Aging (specifically as part of the Aging and Disability Resource Network), the Unified Long Term Care Systems, the Governor's Council on People with Disabilities, the Ohio Olmstead Task Force, the Ohio Department of Transportation, Delaware Creative Housing, the Ohio Department of Development (Interagency Council on Homelessness and Affordable Housing) and (Fair Housing Advisory Committee), the Ohio Department of Job and Family Services (Consumer Direction Waiver Committee, Medical Care Advisory Committee, Medicaid Rules and Regulations Committee), the Ohio Department of Health, Coalition on Homelessness and Housing in Ohio, Assistive Technology of Ohio, Arc of Ohio, AXIS Center for Public Awareness of People with Disabilities, Goodwill Industries, Ohio Department of Mental Health, the Paralyzed Veterans of America, and Cerebral Palsy Association.

The SILC and DSU have significantly increased their cooperation and coordination with other state agencies and each other. Some examples such as accessible and affordable housing, transportation, Medicaid Buy-In, and the Money Follows the Person demonstration project (HOME Choice), the Unified Long Term Care System, the Disability Employment Process Improvement Workgroup and the Visitability Strategy Group have shown to be areas where differing goals can be met.

1.6 Coordination of Services

Describe how IL services funded under chapter 1 of title VII of the Act will be coordinated with and complement other services to avoid unnecessary duplication with other Federal, State, and local programs, including the OIB program authorized by chapter 2 of title VII of the Act, that provide IL- or VR-related services.

The SILC, CILs, OACIL, and DSU collaborate with numerous federal, state and local programs to coordinate services and maximize resources. At the local level, CILs develop partnerships with local committees, task forces, and agencies to coordinate education and provide and support programs for people with disabilities such as:
Partner with the county Developmental Disabilities (DD)agency and community colleges and State Vocational Rehabilitation agency to provide support services that lead to vocational outcomes;
Work with city officials and the county community development department to use a portion of the city's HOME funds for a Tenant Based Rental Assistance Program. This program provides housing vouchers to more people with disabilities.
Provide durable medical equipment to people with disabilities who may not otherwise be able to afford such equipment. In addition, assistive devices are loaned to people with disabilities.
Work with DSU Older Blind Program to provide independent living skills training and equipment services to a population that otherwise might not be served in their areas.
Coordinate with State agencies such as the Department of DD and the Department of Job and Family Services to provide education and support services to people with disabilities who want to transition from institutional settings into community-based environments.
Team with local and county agencies to provide transportation to persons with disabilities.
Work with schools to help children, youth and their families navigate through the system of Individual Education Plans and transition from school to independent living. The collaborations are with groups such as the Ohio Coalition for the Education of Children with Disabilities, the Job Accommodation Network, local social and civic clubs, and Urban Youth Works.
Additional coordination of services with the Ohio Civil Rights Commission and HUD to file and resolve individual civil rights complaints.
Participate with other local and county agencies as a part of county-wide Emergency Preparedness Councils.

SILC and the DSU work cooperatively with the CILs, OACIL, and agencies including the DD Council, Ohio Department of Job and Family Services, Ohio Department of DD, the Ohio Housing Finance Agency, the Ohio Department of Health, the Ohio Department of Development, and the Ohio Department of Aging to work on housing issues, Olmstead implementation, activities associated with creating home and community-based services and to provide space for meetings. SILC underwrites some of the expenses for these collaborative efforts and may serve as a facilitator for the meetings. SILC uses non-matched state dollars to support activities such as printing and mailing post cards to CILs for distribution through their mailing lists that advertise meetings that are set to establish priorities for the Ohio Legal Rights Service or the Ohio Rehabilitation Services Commission.

1.7 Independent Living Services for Individuals who are Older Blind

Describe how the DSU seeks to incorporate into, and describe in, the State plan any new methods or approaches for the provision of IL services to older individuals who are blind that are developed under the Older Individuals who are Blind program and that the DSU determines to be effective.

The Ohio Independent Living Older Blind program is operated outside the Independent Living Program.

During 2009 RSC served 2,055 consumers through Ohio's Independent Living Program for Older Individuals with Vision Loss. People served are generally over the age of 70 and want to continue working, volunteering or maintaining their home. RSC also participates in Ohio's Task Force for Preserving Adult Vision, which was created by the General Assembly during 2005.

The Independent Living Older Blind Program (ILOB) has worked the past several years to encourage Independent Living Centers to contract with the Ohio Rehabiliation Services Commission to provide direct services to eligible consumers of the ILOB Program.

The Bureau of Services for the Visually Impaired (BSVI) also provides direct services to ILOB Program participants and staff is encouraged to use CILs when possible as service providers or resources to serve consumers. The new BSVI Director plans to incorporate improved communications between the CILs and the ILOB Program staff to share information and address mutual issues to serve consumers. BSVI staff attend various SILC meetings as appropriate. DSU staff monitor ILOB contracts.

State Plan for Independent Living (SPIL)

State:

Ohio

Agency:

Ohio Rehabilitation Services Commission

Plan for:

2011-2013

Submitted in fiscal year:

2010

Part II: Narrative

Section 2: Scope, Extent, and Arrangements of Services

2.1 Scope and Extent

2.1A Check the appropriate boxes in the SPIL Instrument table indicating the types of IL services to be provided to meet the objectives identified in section 1.2 of this SPIL, and whether the services will be provided by the CILs or by the DSU (directly and/or through contract or grant).

Table 2.1A: Independent living services

Provided by the DSU (directly)

Provided by the DSU (through contract and/or grant)

Provided by the CILs (Not through DSU contracts/ grants)

Core Independent Living Services - Information and referral

No

Yes

Yes

Core Independent Living Services - IL skills training

No

Yes

Yes

Core Independent Living Services - Peer counseling

No

Yes

Yes

Core Independent Living Services - Individual and systems advocacy

No

Yes

Yes

Counseling services, including psychological, psychotherapeutic, and related services

No

No

No

Services related to securing housing or shelter, including services related to community group living, and supportive of the purposes of this Act and of the titles of this Act, and adaptive housing services (including appropriate accommodations to and modifications of any space used to serve, or occupied by, individuals with significant disabilities)

No

Yes

Yes

Rehabilitation technology

Yes

Yes

Yes

Mobility training

No

Yes

Yes

Services and training for individuals with cognitive and sensory disabilities, including life skills training, and interpreter and reader services

No

Yes

Yes

Personal assistance services, including attendant care and the training of personnel providing such services

No

Yes

Yes

Surveys, directories and other activities to identify appropriate housing, recreation, accessible transportation and other support services

No

Yes

Yes

Consumer information programs on rehabilitation and IL services available under this Act, especially for minorities and other individuals with disabilities who have traditionally been unserved or underserved by programs under this Act

Yes

Yes

Yes

Education and training necessary for living in the community and participating in community activities

No

Yes

Yes

Supported living

No

No

No

Transportation, including referral and assistance for such transportation

No

Yes

Yes

Physical rehabilitation

No

No

No

Therapeutic treatment

No

No

No

Provision of needed prostheses and other appliances and devices

No

No

Yes

Individual and group social and recreational services

No

Yes

Yes

Training to develop skills specifically designed for youths who are individuals with significant disabilities to promote self-awareness and esteem, develop advocacy and self-empowerment skills, and explore career options

Yes

Yes

Yes

Services for children with significant disabilities

No

Yes

Yes

Services under other Federal, State, or local programs designed to provide resources, training, counseling, or other assistance of substantial benefit in enhancing the independence, productivity, and quality of life of individuals with significant disabilities

No

Yes

Yes

Appropriate preventive services to decrease the need of individuals with significant disabilities for similar services in the future

No

Yes

Yes

Community awareness programs to enhance the understanding and integration into society of individuals with disabilities

No

Yes

Yes

Other necessary services not inconsistent with the Act

No

Yes

Yes

2.1B Describe any service provision priorities, including types of services or populations, established for meeting the SPIL objectives identified in section 1.2.

In Goal 1 the SILC, CILs and DSU have identification of a statewide network of IL services and supports, promoting choice and community based living opportunities for people with disabilities as a priority. This priority requires working with not only the DSU, CILs and the Ohio Association of Centers for Independent Living (OACIL), but partnering with groups like Delaware Creative Housing and Creative Living Systems who provide home modifications and build complete accessible, affordable homes for people with disabilities.

CILs work in conjunction with the HOME Choice program and Access Success projects to help people with disabilities who want to leave a long-term care facility do so. However, those programs are time and fund-limited, so identifying other programs and community supports is essential. CILs work with local groups to secure small grants to help defray costs of moving, furniture, and adaptive equipment that may be needed to live independently in the community. In addition, providing peer support and advocacy are key elements to the successful transition of individuals into community settings, and CILs and the DSU provide those services. Representatives from the DSU, SILC and OACIL will participate in Unified Long Term Care System meetings to identify and advocate for new resources to expand services with mutually beneficial outcomes for IL and VR.

Goal 2 is also a major priority for this SPIL. The statewide network of independent living services and supports need to receive sufficient funding to sustain and expand the capacity of current CILs and to add CILs as needed to address the needs of unserved and underserved areas of the state. This priority is crucial and holds the keys to success for other goals listed in this SPIL. SILC, CILs and OACIL will work to educate legislators and other agencies at the state and federal level at least twice a year about the impact of state and federal program funding on the provisions of IL services in Ohio. SILC and OACIL will also strategize with the legislative liaison of the DSU to facilitate legislative outreach. In year one of the SPIL ARRA funds will be used to create more outreach capacity for underserved areas of the state, however by years two and three, new sources of funding will be necessary in order to sustain whatever growth is achieved. SILC will hire a person who will assist CILs in writing grants that may help sustain programs and will utilize experienced staff to help CILs identify other sources of funding. The SILC will provide additional funding so that OACIL can add an employee who can assist the association with administrative tasks in order for CIL directors and their staffs to more effectively meet the needs of their consumers.

Goals 3,4 and 5 are also important to the successful implementation of this SPIL and help to address our overall mission of Ohioans with disabilities participating fully in their community, living everyday life with the same opportunities and same choices as all members of society. Access barriers are important and SILC and CILs will partner with agencies such as the Ohio Legal Rights Service, ADA-Ohio, Great Lakes ADA and Acessible IT Center, and the Ohio Civil Rights Commission to educate organizations, small businesses, and the general public on at least two ADA compliance responsibility topics at the local level on an annual basis. CILs will educate persons with disabilities on their specific civil rights regarding access through newsletters, website, workshops and one to one training.

People with disabilities must be included in all planning with and information distribution regarding Ohios Emergency Planning Management. SILC, CILs and the DSU will distribute information regarding Emergency Planning at their meetings, conferences, seminars and to persons who are developing IL plans. Requests will also be made for representatives from the SILC and CILs to be partners in developing emergency plans.

During the term of this SPIL the DSU, SILC and CILs recognize the importance of helping youth successfully transition from the academic setting into work environments. Youth with disabilities must also transition into roles on Councils, Boards, and committees, that represent people with disabilities, and into roles as educated voters. SILC and CILs will work with the Governor Council on People with Disabilities during their Youth Leadership Forum to provide more information about IL and the roles of CILs, SILC and the DSU.

2.1C If the State allows service providers to charge consumers for the cost of services or to consider the ability of individual consumers to pay for the cost of IL services, specify the types of IL services for which costs may be charged and for which a financial need test may be applied, and describe how the State will ensure that:

  • Any consideration of financial need is applied uniformly so that all individuals who are eligible for IL services are treated equally; and
  • Written policies and consumer documentation required by 34 CFR 364.59(d) will be kept by the service provider.

Indicate N/A if not applicable.

N/A

2.2 Arrangements for State-Provided Services

2.2A If the DSU will provide any of the IL services identified in section 2.1A through grants or contractual arrangements with third parties, describe such arrangements.

N/A

2.2B If the State contracts with or awards a grant to a center for the general operation of the center, describe how the State will ensure that the determination of an individual's eligibility for services from that center shall be delegated to the center.

The DSU incorporates language into grants issued to CILs regarding the determination of an individual's eligibility. The DSU ensures this specification is met through DSU conducted audits.

State Plan for Independent Living (SPIL)

State:

Ohio

Agency:

Ohio Rehabilitation Services Commission

Plan for:

2011-2013

Submitted in fiscal year:

2010

Part II: Narrative

Section 3: Design for the Statewide Network of Centers

3.1 Existing Network

Provide an overview of the existing network of centers, including non-Part C-funded centers that comply with the standards and assurances in section 725 (b) and (c) of the Act, and the geographic areas and populations currently served by the centers.

Ohio has a network of eleven CILs. Two of the CILs (Ability Center and LEAP) have branch offices. A brief description of some of the unique programs CILs developed in response to the needs assessments in their communities is noted below.

The state and federally funded CIL network is geographically dispersed in Ohio. Seven of the CILs are located in Ohio's largest metropolitan areas. Ten of the eleven Centers receive some if not all of their federal funding through Part C funding.

Ohio's CILs affirm that they meet the definition of a CIL as set forth in Section 702 of the Rehabilitation Act, as amended, within the Workforce Investment Act, and the Policy Directive RSA-PD-03-06, dated August 8, 2003. Ohio does not recognize organizations that do not follow Section 702 as CILs, even if they identify themselves as such. This discernment is important with the increasing use of "Independent Living Centers" to identify a residential non-profit business.

All Ohio recipients of financial assistance under Parts C, B, State and other sources comply with applicable EDGAR fiscal and accounting requirements and ensure that the Centers have the appropriate mechanisms in place to track both Part C and non-Part C funding.

* THE ABILITY CENTER OF GREATER TOLEDO (ACT)
Counties Served: Fulton, Henry, Lucas, Ottawa, Williams, Defiance and Wood - Part B and Part C funding
Branch Center Without walls- 4 County NW Ohio. Fulton, Henry, Williams, and Defiance
County: Defiance
Branch Center Port Clinton
County: Ottawa

ACT Community Living Program has helped more than 320 PWDs (people with disabilities) between 20 and 80 years old move into their own apartments.
Our Home Accessibility program provides wheelchair ramps and minor home modifications for 100 consumers a year. The program is supported with funds from State and City community development funds.
Youth Leadership Program/ Camp Cricket is a program where high school students with disabilities gain confidence and develop leadership skills through ACT's Youth Leadership Skills Training Program. Students learn basic leadership skills and the importance of community volunteerism. Camp Cricket is an inclusive summer day camp program for children with and without disabilities. Guided by camp counselors with and without disabilities, campers develop life-long social and independent living skills, build self-esteem, and learn teamwork and creative expression through basic camp activities.
Pathways 2 Success is a partnership with the county DD agency and Owens Community College, to provide support services that lead to vocational outcomes. The program is sponsored by RSC.

* ACCESS CENTER FOR INDEPENDENT LIVING, INC. (ACIL)
Counties Served: Clark, Greene, Montgomery, Preble - Part C funding

Beyond providing "4-Core" services to over 3,000 people with disabilities each year ACIL provides durable medical equipment to individuals in need through its Recycled Equipment Donated for Independence (REDI).68% of the populations served were minority populations. In addition, ACIL provides Transition Coordination, IL Skills Training and Community Support Coaching to participants of Ohio's HOME Choice Program. ACIL is currently providing disability awareness training to 670 fixed route, Para transit and administrative employees of the Greater Dayton Regional Transit Authority and successfully advocated for the hiring of a new Para transit director that has a disability. Much of ACIL staff energy is also focused on identifying and assisting in the transitioning of people living in institutions who no longer wish to reside there.

* CENTER FOR INDEPENDENT LVING OPTIONS (CILO)
Counties Served: Adams, Brown, Butler, Clermont, Hamilton, Highland, and Warren - Part C funding

CILO serves individuals with disabilities in the Greater Cincinnati region. CILO serves over 2300 individuals annually and provides information and referral to another 4700 individuals.

CILO feels that it has a responsibility to listen to the needs of the community and to be responsive to those needs. Responsiveness is in turn, demonstrated through the orchestration of special events, workshops and new programs that fill identified community needs. CILO-sponsors a biennial Cincinnati City Council Candidates forum, which provides a unique opportunity for Strong Mayoral and City Council candidates to express their viewpoint and opinions on the issues that concern the voters with disabilities in Cincinnati. CILO was also in the forefront of creating a new self-advocacy group called, Tenants United for Truth, which supports housing for all by working to change negative public perception of affordable housing and affordable housing tenants. CILO was also instrumental in having the City of Cincinnati use a portion of its HOME funds for a Tenant Based Rental Assistance (TBRA) Program. CILO acts as the application host to the TBRA program, which is managed by the Hamilton County Community Development Department and has processed more than 200 applications. More than 85 housing vouchers were provided during the fiscal year and the City of Cincinnati has recently increased the number of housing vouchers to 125. CILO staff has been involved in Ohio's Money Follows the Person demonstration project: the HOME Choice program. We have successfully transitioned twenty-six consumers in the past year and also provided IL Skills training and Community Support Coaching. CILO has been providing support services and permanent housing vouchers to homeless individuals with disabilities for the past 13 years with funding provided through the U.S Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) under the Continuum of Care. This project was designed to coordinate and enhance housing opportunities for participants of the CILO's Homeless Disability Services program. CILO's Permanent Housing Program facilitates faster placement of the HDS consumers by providing a rent subsidy for those consumers who may not be eligible for traditional Section 8 certificates or other rental subsidies. CILO is entering its fifth year of operation of our Art Beyond Boundaries arts program and fine arts exhibition gallery for artists with disabilities located in historic Over-The-Rhine. Art Beyond Boundaries presents six exhibitions per year and has exhibited and marketed the art of more than 350 individual artists with disabilities since its inception. These programs are an initiative unique to the area.

* INDEPENDENT LIVING CENTER OF NORTH CENTRAL OHIO (ILCNCO)
Counties Served: Morrow, Crawford, Huron, Ashland, Richland and Knox - Part B and Part C funding

The ILCNCO serves primarily rural counties. Our services include the four core services as required. In addition, the agency offers the following: Appreciation of Arts Program, Y Programs for families and individuals with disabilities; Power to Change Education Program: Direct Services; Youth Sports, Summer Kids Programs, Emergency Services; Boy Scouts; assistive devices loan closet; assistance with Social Security/other benefits for I/Ds. We also assist students with I.E.P hearings. We also have funds through the Federal Poverty Program to assist with housing, utilities and food. We have four staff members at this time. Our central office is in Mansfield, Ohio (Richland County).

* LINKING EMPLOYMENT, ABILITIES, AND POTENTIAL (LEAP)
Branch office: Lorain County
Counties Served with Part B and Part C funds: Erie and Lorain
Counties Served with other funds: Cuyahoga

Unique Activities and Services:
- Independent Living services to Older Blind (Title VII ILOB-Lorain only)
- Home Choice Transition Coordination
- Public Policy Center
- Assistive Technology Center
Sorenson Video Relay Service
- Community Employment Services
- Youth Transition Programs:
School-to-Work and High School/High Tech (Cuyahoga only)
Urban Youth Works (ODJFS)
- Center for Personal Assistance:
Home Health Aide Training; STNA training; Dining Assistant Training (Cuyahoga only)
Personal Care Assistant Cooperative (Statewide TA)
- Disability Benefits Assistance Services:
SSI/SSDI Benefits Analysis
Ohio Benefit Bank Site
Benefits Enrollment Center (NCOA)
- Recreation program (Cuyahoga only)
- CARF Accredited
- Youth Development Program - PEPNet award
- Ohio of Association of Non-Profits Standards of Excellence certification
- EEOC Freedom to Compete award winner
- Secretary of Labor's (DOL) New Freedom Initiative award winner

Collaborating and Coordinating:
- Aging and Disability Resource Center State Partner
- Center for Community Solutions - Council on Older Persons
- Disability Policy Coalition
- Ohio Olmstead Taskforce
- Ohio Secretary of State ADA Advisory Committee
- Save Transit Now-Move Ohio Forward Coalition
- Partnership with Invacare for wheelchair repair
- United Way Agency Partner in Cuyahoga and Lorain Counties

* MID-OHIO BOARD FOR AN INDEPENDENT LIVING ENVIRONMENT (MOBILE)
County Served: Franklin - Part B and Part C funding

MOBILE is one of more than three hundred not-for-profit Centers for Independent Living that are directed and administered by people with disabilities in the United States. MOBILE was founded on principles that affirm the rights of people with various types of disabilities to live their lives with a full measure of liberty and human dignity.
MOBILE provides four core services (Advocacy, Independent Living Skills Training, Information and Referral, Peer Support) to people with disabilities to enhance their independent lifestyle in the community. MOBILE also provides nursing home transitioning for people desiring to live in the community. MOBILE has additional programs and services that will assist people with disabilities and their family and friends, such as assistive devices for people who are deaf, equipment loan program, independent living plans, library services, and personal assistant services. All of MOBILE's services and programs are free.

* SERVICES FOR INDEPENDENT LIVING (SIL)
Counties Served with Part B and Part C funds: Cuyahoga, Geauga, and Lake.
Counties Served with other funds: selected services in Lorain.

SIL serves as the local point of contact for people with physical disabilities that wish to apply for Section 8 housing in Cuyahoga County. SIL produces and disseminates annual housing lists of subsidized apartments in Cuyahoga, Geauga, Lake and Lorain Counties. SIL engages in an on-going education and advocacy campaign in support of community-based care. SIL serves as the State of Ohio PCA facility representative for people living in five northeast Ohio counties. SIL has a durable equipment program for people who are in need of equipment.

* SOCIETY FOR EQUAL ACCESS/INDEPENDENT LIVING CENTER, INC. (S.E.A.)
Counties Served: Belmont, Carroll, Coshocton, Guernsey, Harrison, Holmes, Jefferson, and Tuscarawas - Part B and Part C funding

S.E.A.'s transportation department supplies Para transit services throughout Tuscarawas County to destinations within a 150-mile radius one-way, 300 miles round trip. S.E.A. is coordinating with three agencies within Tuscarawas County providing transportation to persons with disabilities. We are transporting up to 200 people per day.

S.E.A. has a grant from the Ohio Housing Trust Fund to supply low income, elderly and persons with disabilities emergency home repairs and ramps. This service is available to all eight counties served by S.E.A. Also offered are ramps to the same population with a grant through the United Way. We are also offering homemaker classes to persons with disabilities in a classroom setting and one-on-one follow-up.

S.E.A. has peer support groups established in seven of our eight counties we serve.

* SOUTHEASTERN OHIO CENTER FOR INDEPENDENT LIVING (SOCIL)
Counties Served: Fairfield and Hocking - Part B and Part C funding

SOCIL targets cross disability through "EMPACT" a group that empowers more parents to advocate for children of today by providing parents and guardians with information and training; "What's Next" a training that helps families navigate the system of services as the child transitions from school to independent living. In addition, families are connected to sport programs such as adaptive basketball, tee-ball, and football. SOCIL continues to see an increase in requests for IL skills training as a result of its ongoing outreach to high schools. SOCIL also coordinates "Gaining Back Independence" a peer support group of young adults living in the community; and Aktion Club - a social, civic club building leadership and community supports. SOCIL offers ability awareness and access education through a collaborative effort of hosting ADA, Job Accommodation Network and Ohio Coalition for the Education of Children with Disabilities webcasts. SOCIL is actively involved on a local and statewide effort to increase affordable, accessible housing for people with significant disabilities. SOCIL continues to improve community access by conducting ADA surveys and educating the public. Ongoing transportation collaboration has increased or maintained accessible transit services.

* TRI-COUNTY INDEPENDENT LIVING CENTER, INC. (Tri-C)
Counties Served: Portage, Stark, Summit - Part B and Part C funding

Significant needs of the disability community include affordable, accessible housing and barrier removal. In response to these needs Tri-C assisted consumers in filing l5 successful individual fair housing complaints with the Ohio Civil Rights Commission (OCRC). In addition, Center staff aggressively undertook barrier removal actions leading to the filing of 6l complaints with OCRC and the U.S. Department of Housing & Urban Development (HUD). A total of 47 complaints were positively resolved.
In addition, the Center continued its operation of a donated loan closet of durable medical equipment for consumers and expended an additional $58,000 in home modifications. These efforts resulted in transitioning l6 individuals from nursing homes into the community; 4l persons remained in their homes; and 3l homeless individuals with disabilities were moved into affordable accessible housing and assisted in obtaining benefits.

Tri-County provides ongoing peer support and independent living skills training classes; access surveys for housing and public accommodations compliance; and serves as a catalyst in Olmstead community-based services.

* WESTERN RESERVE INDEPENDENT LIVING CENTER, INC. (WRILC)
Counties Served: Trumbull and Mahoning - Part B funding

WRILC is the hub of the Mahoning Valley serving people with disabilities in their desire to be as independent as they wish. We have monthly consumer controlled peer support days as well as independent living classes. We also teach computers weekly to interested consumers. WRILC formed a county-wide Emergency Preparedness Council. We are starting emergency preparedness classes for consumers, agency people, and seniors. We transition people with disabilities out of nursing homes and provide ILS as well as Community Coaching. WRILC uses the resources in the community to improve the lives of consumers. (Ex: food distribution from a local church, and eye exams and glasses at no cost). We advocate for consumers needs as they occur (utilities, accessibility, jobs, transportation, etc.). Our information and referral services have helped many people with disabilities, their families, and friends. Our information database also is quite extensive as we collaborate with area agencies and organizations. We are members of our local Regional Chamber of Commerce, Homeless Coalition, and Trumbull Advocacy Protection Network. WRILC has TTY service for consumers as well as Braille transcription. We provide housing lists to consumers with a need for housing and help them fill-out applications. WRILC is located in the Trumbull Housing Authority building. We are a HEAP distribution center for applications, and an Ohio Benefits Bank provider.

3.2 Expansion of Network

Describe the design for the further expansion of the network, including identification of the unserved and underserved areas in the State and the order of priority for serving these areas as additional funding becomes available (beyond the required cost-of-living increase).

Unserved areas of Ohio are defined as counties that are outside of the service areas of existing CILs. Ohio has many such areas. One of the largest is the one in the southeast portion of the state known as the Appalachian area. This area stretches roughly east from Franklin County and encompasses urban areas such as Zanesville and south of Fairfield County. Another is a four-county one located in Northeast Ohio. Called the Youngstown area, it covers Columbiana and Ashtabula counties. Most of the counties to the east of the Cincinnati CIL are unserved, including the towns of Gallipolis and Chillicothe. Finally, there is a large unserved area that stretches from the Toledo CIL service area south to Dayton and east to Franklin County (Columbus).

OHIO'S UNSERVED COUNTIES BY AREA
APPALACHIAN AREA:
Gallia, Licking, Meigs, Monroe, Morgan, Muskingum, Noble, Perry
YOUNGSTOWN AREA:
Ashtabula, Columbiana, Medina, Wayne
SOUTHERN OHIO AREA:
Clinton, Fayette, Jackson, Lawrence, Madison, Pickaway, Pike, Ross, Scioto, Vinton, Washington, and Athens
NORTH / WESTERN OHIO AREA:
Allen, Auglaize, Champaign, Darke, Delaware, Hancock, Hardin, Logan, Marion, Mercer, Miami, Paulding, Putnam, Sandusky, Seneca, Shelby, Union, Van Wert, Wyandot

Based upon strong public interest and letter writing campaigns the priorities for development of new CILs are:
* The northeast quadrant of Trumbull and Mahoning Counties as a Part C center. The minimum funding to establish a new center is $100,000.
* Funds in excess of COLA, but not in the amount necessary to start a new center, shall be distributed to existing Part C centers at the same percentage presently on file with RSA.
* If sufficient funds become available, Ohio will expand the network of centers to include unserved ares of Athens and Washington Counties.

3.3 Section 723 States Only

3.3A If the State follows an order of priorities for allocating funds among centers within a State that is different from what is outlined in 34 CFR 366.22, describe the alternate order of priority that the DSU director and the SILC chair have agreed upon. Indicate N/A if not applicable.

N/A

3.3B Describe how the State policies, practices and procedures governing the awarding of grants to centers and the oversight of these centers are consistent with 34 CFR 366.37 and 366.38.

N/A

State Plan for Independent Living (SPIL)

State:

Ohio

Agency:

Ohio Rehabilitation Services Commission

Plan for:

2011-2013

Submitted in fiscal year:

2010

Part II: Narrative

Section 4: Designated State Unit (DSU)

4.1 Administrative Support Services

4.1A Describe the administrative support services to be provided by the DSU for the SILS (Part B) program and, if the State is a Section 723 State, for the CIL (Part C) program.
Refer to the SPIL Instructions for additional information about administrative support services.

The DSU supports IL by providing a liaison to the SILC, CILs and the Ohio Assocation of Centers for Independent Living (OACIL). The DSU collaborates with OACIL regarding major policies and administrative decisions and/or statewide planning. The DSU facilitates SILC activities by making conference rooms and videoconferencing available to them. The DSU collaborates with SILC/CIL to publish and communicate CIL information to the public.

4.1B Describe other DSU arrangements for the administration of the IL program, if any.

The DSU is responsible for receiving, dispersing, and accounting for all SILC and CIL funds that are Title VII Part B. They serve as the pass-through for state GRF non-match funds.

State Plan for Independent Living (SPIL)

State:

Ohio

Agency:

Ohio Rehabilitation Services Commission

Plan for:

2011-2013

Submitted in fiscal year:

2010

Part II: Narrative

Section 5: Statewide Independent Living Council (SILC)

5.1 Resource plan

5.1A Describe the resource plan prepared by the SILC in conjunction with the DSU for the provision of resources, including staff and personnel, made available under parts B and C of chapter 1 of title VII, section 101(a)(18) of the Act, and from other public and private sources that may be necessary to carry out the functions of the SILC identified in section 705(c). The description must address the three years of this SPIL.

  • Refer to the SPIL Instructions for more information about completing this section.

For more information click the icon.

The financial tables and narratives in section 1.3 describe the IL financial plan and the outline for the SILC resource plan. In kind resources that will be utilized during the three years of this SPIL include, but are not limited to, meeting space for public hearings, videoconferencing, and teleconferencing capabilities that are donated by the DSU, the SILC will provide computer workbooks that encourage committee meetings to occur by means of GoToMeeting formats, SILC will provide an employee to help CILs track reporting information regarding use of ARRA funds, and CILs will provide space for SILC meetings. The SILC, CILs, the Ohio Association of Centers for Independent Living (OACIL) and the DSU will also work cooperatively to provide links on websites and space in newsletters to educate and share information with the IL community about important conferences, activities, or training sessions that may be occurring in different parts of the state. The SILC and DSU may provide volunteers to help with events that are planned by the CILs or OACIL. Technical assistance may also be shared among the IL partners. Equipment such as brailling machines will also be available for use from a CIL.

5.1B Describe how the following SILC resource plan requirements will be addressed.

  • The SILC's responsibility for the proper expenditure of funds and use of resources that it receives under the resource plan.

The Executive Director manages all financial matters of the SILC including the receipt of funds, request for funds, disbursement of non-match GRF funds, accounting of funds, monitors and is responsible for all audits of the organization and any funding accountability. She develops the annual budget with the SILC finance committee which is then approved by the full council and amended, as needed. The Executive Director reports to the Council.

Funds are used according to regulations for expenditures under the Rehabilitation Act, as amended, EDGAR, OMB A-122 and the Ohio Legislature, according to the funding source. The SPIL determines the priorities for use of the funds for activities.

  • Non-inclusion of conditions or requirements in the SILC resource plan that may compromise the independence of the SILC.

The SILC and DSU work hard to maintain the independence of the SILC by not having language in grant award agreements that may inadvertently compromise the SILC's autonomy. They have worked cooperatively at the state level to educate legislators and key staff in OBM that SILC is an independent program that is fiscally housed within the DSU.

  • Reliance, to the maximum extent possible, on the use of resources in existence during the period of implementation of the State plan.

SILC will rely, to the maximum extent possible, on resources in existence during the three-year implementation period of the State plan. The DSU has made a committment for additional Innovation and Expansion funds each year of this Plan. These funds have been factored into the resource planning and the development of the goals and objectives.

5.2 Establishment and Placement

Describe how the establishment and placement of the SILC ensures its independence with respect to the DSU and all other State agencies. Refer to the SPIL Instructions for more information about completing this section.

The SILC is not established as an entity within any state agency, including the DSU, and is independent of the DSU and other state agencies. The following is a brief description of the legal status of the SILC.
The SILC is an independent agency within state government as recognized by federal law, the Governor's Executive Order and the Ohio Revised Code (R.C 3304.50).
The Ohio Attorney General's office affirms that we are also legislatively recognized by the appropriation of funding in GRF 415-402 and ND 31.4 415-611, which are appropriations to fund the State Independent Living Council.

SILC is not housed physically or programmatically within the DSU or other state agencies. The office is physically located at 670 Morrison Road, Suite 200, Gahanna, Ohio 43230.

Per state statute the SILC hired an interim Executive Director in November 2009. Staff is interviewed, hired, trained, managed, evaluated and, if necessary, fired by the Executive Director.
The Executive Director periodically contracts with independent firms/contractors to coordinate and manage special projects or functions of the office.
The SILC voting members evaluate the Executive Director at a time established by the council.

The SILC has its own tax ID number and pays payroll and expenses through its checking account at Huntington National Bank and JP Morgan Chase Bank. The SILC creates its own budget.

5.3 Appointment and Composition

Describe the process used by the State to appoint members to the SILC who meet the composition requirements in section 705(b). Refer to the SPIL Instructions for more information about completing this section.

The Governor uses his discretion in appointing members to the SILC. The Office of Boards and Commissions widely publicizes the availability of positions and has developed applications that are available on the Governor's website and at the SILC website.

The State ensures that the SILC composition and qualification requirements are met by reviewing all information on the membership application, and contacting the SILC Executive Director to ask additional questions regarding requirements as set forth in section 705(b).

The SILC Chair is elected from among the voting council members for a one-year term. The Chair and other elected members of the Executive Committee may serve two consecutive one-year terms.

The term limits of voting council members are maintained by the Governor's Executive Order, which states that no member shall serve more than two (2) consecutive full terms. Members may be reappointed for one term, and a vacancy occurring in the SILC membership shall be filled in the same manner as the original appointment.

SILC actively recruits for new members through other organizations/agencies who may have an interest in disability issues. Recruitment is also done on an individual basis primarily by staff and SILC members.

5.4 Staffing

Describe how the following SILC staffing requirements will be met.

  • SILC supervision and evaluation, consistent with State law, of its staff and other personnel as may be necessary to carry out its functions.

The SILC employee handbook dictates policies for staffing and states that employees of the SILC serve at the will and pleasure of the Executive Director. The Executive Director works directly with and is managed solely by the Council.

The SILC Employee Handbook indicates that the voting members of the Council have the ultimate approval authority for all personnel policies. The Executive Director has the responsibility for implementing the personnel policies. Employment is voluntarily entered into, and the employee is free to resign at any time, with or without cause. Similarly, SILC may terminate the employment relationship at will at any time, with or without cause, so long as there is no violation of applicable federal or state law. SILC may exercise its option to have some or all employees under contract.

Employees are provided with a job description and are requested to review the job description and provide feedback to the Executive Director regarding changes and improvements.

All new employees will receive a performance appraisal after 90 days. The Executive Director or designee shall meet with evaluated employee. All employees will be given the opportunity to self review and make copies of their performance reviews. Employees who disagree with their appraisal are encouraged to discuss their appraisal with the Executive Director and provide written comments to be included in their personnel file. Employees may request an evaluation at any time.

The SILC executive committee will conduct the evaluations of the Executive Director and make recommendations to the full Council for final approval. Evaluations will be taken into consideration when opportunities for advancement and salary increases are available. The SILC Executive Director works directly with and is managed solely by the SILC Executive Committee. That committee assigns the duties, defines the responsibilities, supervises, and evaluates the Executive Director. The Executive Director directly manages, assigns duties, delegates responsibilities to and evaluates staff.

  • Non-assignment of duties to SILC staff and other personnel made available by the DSU, or any other State agency or office, that would create a conflict of interest while assisting the SILC in carrying out its duties.

No other organizations provide staff support to the SILC. Neither the DSU nor any other organization can assign duties or responsibilities to SILC staff. The DSU and SILC take great care to collaborate yet remain independent. The DSU serves as the fiscal agent for Part B and state dollars. The DSU and SILC have agreed that the state auditor will do auditing of IL state and Part B dollars. This will continue promotion of the partnership of the DSU and SILC, rather than an oversight relationship. SILC is located physically separate from the DSU and DSU personnel are made available only to provide technical assistance as required by federal regulations.

State Plan for Independent Living (SPIL)

State:

Ohio

Agency:

Ohio Rehabilitation Services Commission

Plan for:

2011-2013

Submitted in fiscal year:

2010

Part II: Narrative

Section 6: Service Provider Requirements

Describe how the following service provider requirements will be met:

6.1 Staffing

  • Inclusion of personnel who are specialists in the development and provision of IL services and in the development and support of centers.

CILS affirm by signatures on grant award agreements that providers will follow all the requirements in Sections 6.1 through 6.7 plus the standards and assurances of section 725 and the directives of the State.

The SILC, CILs and the DSU have developed collaborations that allow for the sharing of information regarding specialists. SILC employs an individual with a disability who works with groups and CILs to promote understanding of the regulatory requirements for a group to become a CIL, and provides technical assistance to those groups and existing CILs to ensure that there is proper adherence to title VII of the Act and regulations as set forth in EDGAR.

  • Availability, to the maximum extent feasible, of personnel able to communicate (1) with individuals with significant disabilities who rely on alternative modes of communication, such as manual communication, nonverbal communication devices, Braille, or audio tapes and (2) in the native languages of individuals with significant disabilities whose English proficiency is limited and who apply for or receive IL services under title VII of the Act.

The individual CILs employ staff with the skills needed to meet the particular needs of the persons with disabilities served in that service area. In addition, CILs may have contracts or utilize individual agencies such as Vision Centers, Deaf Centers or online interpreter services for assistive technology or personal interpretters. All written policies, materials, and IL services are provided in alternative formats as requested. Employees and the public are made aware through written policies and disclosures on printed materials that alternative formats are available upon request.

  • Establishment and maintenance of a program of staff development for all classes of positions involved in providing IL services and, where appropriate, in administering the CIL program, improving the skills of staff directly responsible for the provision of IL services, including knowledge of and practice in the IL philosophy.

Staff are trained on cross disability community issues and provide IL core services and IL services to individuals with significant disabilities in an inclusive manner that is neither targeted nor limited to a particular type of significant disabilities. Individual satisfaction surveys and group forums are some ways CILs identify future agency goals and future staff development. Staff development programs insure underrepresented groups continue to receive access to services in a culturally competent manner. Budgets dictate the level of Professional Association memberships and disability related conferences staff attend to acquire new knowledge. Advanced technology allows CILs to participate in cost effective and diverse webinar style training within their own CIL location.

  • Affirmative action to employ and advance in employment qualified individuals with significant disabilities on the same terms and conditions required with respect to the employment of individuals with disabilities under section 503 of the Act.

CILs and SILC are equal opportunity employers. As grantees they agree not to discriminate by reason of race, creed, color, religion, sex, age, disability, national origin, or ancestry. Reasonable accommodations are made for qualified individuals with disabilities. CILs comply with Rehabilitation Act and maintain a staff compliment of at least 51% individuals with disabilities. The annual 704 report reflects the number of persons employed with disabilities as well as a 51% minimum of persons with disabilities with decision making authority.

6.2 Fiscal Control and Fund Accounting

  • Adoption of those fiscal control and fund accounting procedures as may be necessary to ensure the proper disbursement of and accounting for funds made available through parts B and C of chapter 1 of title VII of the Act, in addition to complying with applicable EDGAR fiscal and accounting requirements.

The DSU disperses Part B funding through grant award agreements with the SILC and the CILs on a yearly basis. The grant awards contain the relevant assurances listed in the first part of the SPIL as well as 6.1 through 6.7. They monitor the use of funds by yearly audits as well as sign off approval of the monthly expense listing by the DSU. The sign-off is required before reimbursements may be issued by the DSU. The awards also contain the state provisions required by the office of the governor.
The SILC, DSU and CILs affirm these requirements and expect them to be followed by any contracted service provider.

6.3 Recordkeeping, Access and Reporting

  • Maintenance of records that fully disclose and document the information listed in 34 CFR 364.35.

Maintenance of records comply with applicable EDGAR record keeping requirements. They include a proper system of accounting and other records to account for all expenditures of all project/program costs including approved budgets, invoice copies and receipts, and audit reports. All costs are validated by a payroll record, invoice, cancelled check, or any other generally accepted accounting documentation. Records are retained per retention schedules for specified time periods and are available for review and audit.

  • Submission of annual performance and financial reports, and any other reports that the Secretary determines to be appropriate

Annually the RSA 704 Performance Report Part I is submitted by the SILC and DSU. Likewise annually the RSA 704 Performance Report Part II is submitted by the CILs. CILs provide copies of annual performance report to SILC and DSU. Initial 524 budget expenditures and narratives are submitted to RSA based on individual grant awards. Cost allocation plans are developed and submitted as necessary.

  • Access to the Commissioner and the Comptroller General, or any of their duly authorized representatives, for the purpose of conducting audits, examinations, and compliance reviews, to the information listed in 34 CFR 364.37.

The confidential individual case records, files and consumer service records of individuals served including records of evaluation are maintained and made available to duly authorized representatives. Financial records that fully disclose and document use of financial resources are also maintained and made available. Records and reports are retained for a period of not less than three years following contract end date or until questions arising from the audit have been resolved, whichever is later.

6.4 Eligibility

  • Eligibility of any individual with a significant disability, as defined in 34 CFR 364.4(b), for IL services under the SILS and CIL programs.

Consumer records system shows evidence of services to various individuals or groups of individuals. Staff is instructed that participants are selected without regards to race, creed, color, religion, sex, age, disability, national origin, or ancestry.

  • Ability of any individual to seek information about IL services under these programs and to request referral to other services and programs for individuals with significant disabilities.

Any individual may seek information about IL services under these programs and request referral to other services and programs for individuals with significant disabilities. SILC and CILs maintain a map of the Ohio CIL service areas and CIL contact information so they can connect callers with the most knowledgable CIL. Individual CILs maintain databases of information and referral resources such as electronic files, paper files, and books to assist people with disabilities effectively with services needed.

  • Determination of an individual's eligibility for IL services under the SILS and CIL programs in a manner that meets the requirements of 34 CFR 364.51.

Before or at the same time as an applicant for IL services may begin receiving funded IL services the CIL confirms the individual has met the definition of a person with a significant disability (364.4b). This documentation is dated and signed by the appropriate staff member and maintained in the applicant's file.

  • Application of eligibility requirements without regard to age, color, creed, gender, national origin, race, religion, or type of significant disability of the individual applying for IL services.

Staff are instructed that participants are selected without regards to age, color, creed, gender, national origin, race, religion, or type of significant disability. Consumer records show evidence of services to diverse representation of individuals or groups of individuals.

  • Non-exclusion from receiving IL services of any individual who is present in the State and who is otherwise eligible for IL services, based on the imposition of any State or local residence requirement.

Staff are instructed to assist eligible participants present in the State. No data is present to indicate any complaints have been filed alleging that persons have been denied services based on state or local residence requirements.

6.5 Independent Living Plans

  • Provision of IL services in accordance with an IL plan complying with Sec. 364.52 and mutually agreed upon by the individuals with significant disabilities and the appropriate service provider staff unless the individual signs a waiver stating that an IL plan is unnecessary.

CILs maintain a record of the individual either signing a waiver that an IL plan is not necessary or signing the actual IL plan. The IL plan indicates goals or objectives established, the services to be provided, and the anticipated duration of the service program and each component service. An accessible copy of the IL plan is provided to the individual. The IL plan is reviewed at least annually to determine whether services should be continued, modified, or discontinued, or if the individual should be referred to other services.

6.6 Client Assistance Program (CAP) Information

  • Use of accessible formats to notify individuals seeking or receiving IL services under chapter 1 of title VII about the availability of the CAP program, the purposes of the services provided under the CAP, and how to contact the CAP.

CILs provide a detailed explanation of the availability and purposes of CAP including information on how to contact the program. This information is provided in accessible format as requested. Documentation of this notification to individuals is maintained in their file.

6.7 Protection, Use and Release of Personal Information

  • Adoption and implementation of policies and procedures meeting the requirements of 34 CFR 364.56(a), to safeguard the confidentiality of all personal information, including photographs and lists of names.

Staff are trained on the established policies to safeguard the confidentiality of all personal information, including photographs and lists of names. Unauthorized release of confidential information shall result in disciplinary action. The recipient of services must sign a release of information if they are requesting individual information be released to them, legally authorized representative, or another agency. The signed releases are maintained in the individual's confidential file

State Plan for Independent Living (SPIL)

State:

Ohio

Agency:

Ohio Rehabilitation Services Commission

Plan for:

2011-2013

Submitted in fiscal year:

2010

Part II: Narrative

Section 7: Evaluation

Describe the method that will be used to periodically evaluate the effectiveness of the plan in meeting the objectives established in Section 1. The description must include the State's evaluation of satisfaction by individuals with significant disabilities who have participated in the program.

Section 7: Evaluation

Goal(s) and the related Objective(s) from Section 1

Method that will be used to evaluate

Goal #1

Goal #2

Goal #3

Goal #4

Goal #5

The SILC will develop a data collection sheet so SILC/DSU/CILs can report semi-annual progress on goals. These reports will be monitored and evaluated as needed by the SPIL II Committee of the SILC Board. The data will be reported out bi-annually at SILC board meetings and annually at SPIL public hearings.

Goal #1

Using current baseline data Ohio will be able to measure an increase in services and persons served. The recent Needs Assessment will be distributed annually to measure persons with disabilities satisfaction as a result of increased outreach.

Goal #2

As a result of these objectives and activities Ohio will be able to measure an increase in funding. In addition, Ohio can identify any new CILs that are developed or services that have been expanded into unserved areas.

Goal #3

SILC and CILs will be able to track positive housing initiatives that resulted in an increase in accessible, affordable, and safe housing for persons with disabilities. They will also share new collaborations that resulted in new transportation grants or expansion of services in existing service areas.

Goal #4

CILs and SILC and DSU will be able to track the number of persons with disabilities receiving scholarships to attend disability related conferences and the number of youth that annually are selected to participate in the Youth Leadership Forum. In addition, the voter turn out statistics will show an increase from the baseline 2009 statistics for voters with disabilities.

Goal #5

SILC and CILs and DSU will track the number of educational opportunities offered on Medicaid Buy In and financial literacy and the number of people that participated when applicable. Also Ohio will track the number of new enrollments in the MBIWD program from the current baseline to demonstrate any increase in program participation.

 

 

State Plan for Independent Living (SPIL)

State:

Ohio

Agency:

Ohio Rehabilitation Services Commission

Plan for:

2011-2013

Submitted in fiscal year:

2010

Part II: Narrative

Section 8: State-Imposed Requirements

8 State-Imposed Requirements

Identify any State-imposed requirements contained in the provisions of this SPIL.

N/A

According to the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995, no persons are required to respond to a collection of information unless it displays a valid OMB control number. The valid OMB control number of this information collection is 1820-0527. The time required to complete this information collection is estimated to average 60 hours per response, including the time to review instructions, search existing data sources, gather the data needed, and complete and review the information collection. If you have any comments concerning the accuracy of the time estimate or suggestions for improving this form, please write to: U.S. Department of Education, Washington, D.C. 20202-4760. If you have any comments or concerns regarding the status of your individual submission of this form, write directly to: Ms. Sue Rankin-White, U.S. Department of Education, Rehabilitation Services Administration, PCP-5013, 400 Maryland Ave, SW, Washington, DC 20202-2800.



Ohio CIL Roster